Les Brigands

Les Brigands

Les Brigands

Jacques Offenbach

OPÉRA BOUFFE in three acts by Jacques Offenbach. Libretto by Henri Meilhac and Ludovic Halévy

Premiered at the Théâtre des Variétés on 10 December 1869

François-Xavier Roth & Macha Makeïeff and Jérôme Deschamps

Eric Huchet, Julie Boulianne, Daphné Touchais, Franck Leguérinel, Philippe Talbot, Francis Dudziak, Martial Defontaine, Fernand Bernadi, Loïc Félix, Léonard Pezzino, Thomas Morris, Antoine Garcin, Jean-Marc Martinez, Marc Molomot, Michèle Lagrange, Christine Rigaud, Ronan Debois

Chœurs de l’Opéra de Toulon & Les Siècles

Presentation

Jacques Offenbach, the Second Empire emblematic composer, was one of the originators of operetta, contributing to the European success of a genre designed for the Parisian public with the burlesque spirit of early opéra comique. Between 1855 and 1880 Offenbach staged about a hundred works at the Bouffes Parisiens and in other houses of the Boulevard and developed operetta to match opéra bouffe. The last great success before the 1870 Franco-Prussian war, whose “saber rattling” already resounds in the famous carabinieri chorus, Les Brigands displays a reversed world in which geography and conventions are mistreated, brigandage prevails, the army is on parade rather than on the battlefield and money no longer brings happiness! A delightful parody of the repertoire’s most famous titles – Zampa and Fra Diavolo leading the way – Les Brigands celebrates opéra comique with a highly inventive score.


With the support of:

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Cast

Musical direction, François-Xavier Roth
Stage direction, Macha Makeïeff et Jérôme Deschamps
Costumes, Macha Makeïeff
Lighting, Marie-Christine Soma

Stage assistant, Pierre-Emmanuel Rousseau
Costume assistant, Véronique Grand
Vocal coach, Nathalie Steinberg

Falsacappa, Eric Huchet
Fragoletto, Julie Boulianne
Fiorella, Daphné Touchais
Pietro, Franck Leguérinel
Le Comte de Gloria Cassis, Philippe Talbot
Le Baron de Campo Tasso, Francis Dudziak
Le Prince (Duc de Mantoue), Martial Defontaine
Le Chef des carabiniers, Fernand Bernadi
Antonio, caissier du prince, Loïc Félix
Carmagnola, Léonard Pezzino
Domino, Thomas Morris
Barbavano , Antoine Garcin
Pipo, Jean-Marc Martinez
Adolphe de Valladolid, un page, Marc Molomot
Princesse de Grenade, Michèle Lagrange
Zerlina, La Duchesse, Christine Rigaud
Le Précepteur, Ronan Debois

Actors, Jean-Marc Bihour, Jean-Claude Bolle-Reddat, Laurent Delvert, Robert Horn, Nicole Monestier, Luc Tremblais, François Toumarkine

Chœurs de l’Opéra de Toulon
Orchestre Les Siècles

Revival of the production at the Opéra de Paris in 1993

Coproduction, Opéra de Bordeaux, Opéra Comique, Les Théâtres de la Ville de Luxembourg
Partnership, Opéra de Toulon
Co-producteur associé, Palazzetto Bru Zane – Centre de musique romantique française


With the support of:

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Synopsis

Act I
Some Brigands are watching a hermit who leads peasant girls "to the path of virtue": he is actually dreadful Falsacappa taking captives to his men. Falsacappa's confidant Pietro and his daughter Fiorella give him a portrait of Fiorella in courtly attire for his feast. She confesses to her father that she has had doubts since the band robbed lovely Fragoletto. But the latter arrives to join the bandits for the love of Fiorella. The brigands leave to test his courage. A handsome stranger who lost his way appears: he is the duke of Mantua whose flight is favored by Fiorella. Fragoletto proves himself by catching a courier from the court of Granada to the court of Mantua. He carries a message about a deal between the two states along with the portrait of a Spanish princess. Falsacappa replaces it with that of his daughter and frees the messenger. The day ends with a ceremony held to welcome Fragoletto. It is briefly interrupted by the carabineers' patrol.

Act II
Disguised as beggars, the brigands burst into the inn where the duke of Mantua's envoys are awaiting the princess of Granada and her retinue. Falsacappa wants to take over the money owed to the Granadans by the Mantuans after subtracting the princess's dowry. The brigands disguise themselves as cooks to receive the baron of Campotasso, ambassador of Mantua, and the carabineers who accompany him: they are locked in the cellar. The brigands put on the Italians' clothes to greet the princess of Granada, her preceptor Gloria-Cassis, her loving page Adolphe de Valladolid and the court. As the Spaniards are under lock and key, Falsacappa distributes their roles to his accomplices. But inside the inn full of prisoners, infamous Falsacappa's name is on every tongue. Fortunately, the carabineers are drunk and let the false Spaniards leave for Mantua.

Act III
At his palace in Mantua, the duke is throwing a stag party with his favorites. He asks his treasurer to quickly organize a reception for his future bride and repay the three million. The treasurer, who has squandered the duke's money with loose women, intends to corrupt the Spanish envoy. As the Spanish delegation arrives, Fiorella and the prince recognize each other and the brigands arouse suspicion. When Falsacappa finds out that the treasurer is a colleague, he is about to make a scandal. Thereupon appear the Italians and the true Spaniards along with the carabineers. The latter apprehend the brigands but Fiorella obtains their amnesty from the duke. Gloria-Cassis lets himself be corrupted by the treasurer whereas the brigands decide to become honest.


With the support of:

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